Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

George Woods - dropped pedal

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • George Woods - dropped pedal

    Until my new-to-me George Woods arrives, I wondered if there's a step by step guide to getting a dropped pedal working again. That appears to be the only obvious problem, other than two keys which produce no sound.

    I looked through the James Tyler Restoration Guide (link below) but found no reference to pedals. Maybe it's an obvious, easy-peasy job?

    http://www.reedsoc.org/Repair/introduction.htm

    By the way, on James Tyler's webpage, he shows a Repair CD, with text *and pictures*. I emailed him at the email address listed, but the email address was rejected. Is there another way to contact him?

    Thanks.
    Tom M.
    Eastford CT

  • #2
    Originally posted by nutmegct View Post
    Until my new-to-me George Woods arrives, I wondered if there's a step by step guide to getting a dropped pedal working again. That appears to be the only obvious problem, other than two keys which produce no sound.
    Tom,

    The dropped pedal could be as simple as a strap that's broken. Alternately, it could be a broken spring in the bellows mechanism. Therefore, it could be quite simple or quite complex.

    The keys not producing sound could be as simple as removing the reed with a reed-puller (may come with the organ--others have used a crochet hook), and loosen a piece of lint, dirt, or dust that's keeping the reed from vibrating freely. A good puff of air should do the trick.

    I will send you a PM with other information. Hope this helps.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      And get yourself a bulb syringe for the air puff. It's tempting to use your mouth or a can of air duster but both of those solutions cause rust. Walgreens sells bulb syringes, and some hobby stores have them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
        And get yourself a bulb syringe for the air puff. It's tempting to use your mouth or a can of air duster but both of those solutions cause rust. Walgreens sells bulb syringes, and some hobby stores have them.
        I'm new to the reed organ world. What's an "air puff"? What's it used for?

        Thanks.
        Tom M.
        PS - Kettle Moraine. Wisconsin?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by nutmegct View Post
          I'm new to the reed organ world. What's an "air puff"? What's it used for?
          He's referring to a bulb syringe, often used to clean out babies' noses, etc. Tom is also correct that human breath contains contaminants which could eventually rust the reed. If you have to use your mouth, be sure to clean the reed off well afterward.

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by nutmegct View Post
            I'm new to the reed organ world. What's an "air puff"? What's it used for?

            Thanks.
            Tom M.
            PS - Kettle Moraine. Wisconsin?
            Any time you need air to blow dust off or blow contaminates out of steel reeds. It's intuitive to just take a deep breath and blow with your mouth. But breath is full of invisible water vapour which condenses on the reed. It takes time to happen. Unless you clean the reed with oil and thoroughly dry it afterward, that is. But that's tedious and can be avoided completely by using clean dry air. The reeds are normally exposed to the indoor air wherever it is, so that air is safe. The easiest way to do this is with bulb syringes (because they're very common) or other similar air puffers which frankly I don't know the name of off the top of my head. Horologist suppliers sell them, some model railroad shops have them.

            Yes, the Kettle Moraine is pretty much the Southeast corner of Wisconsin, away from the Lake. People who haven't been here assume that the terrain is flat like Illinois or Iowa, but it's anything but. Not mountainous, but hilly, very hilly.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
              Yes, the Kettle Moraine is pretty much the Southeast corner of Wisconsin, away from the Lake. People who haven't been here assume that the terrain is flat like Illinois or Iowa, but it's anything but. Not mountainous, but hilly, very hilly.
              I'm willing to be you were singlehandedly responsible for the glacier melting millennia ago.;-)O:-)

              I, too, wondered, but relied on every person's factual resource--Winkipedia.

              Michael

              P.S. I think it's a MIDI adapter, but the poster will need to disclose the details. I have been educated on the subject of TC organs' pedals.
              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
              • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm actually surprised that Wikipedia gave us the time of day.

                Earth is far bigger than most people think it is, and is chock full of little pockets of extreme uniqueness. It's easy to take our surroundings for granted. I wish everyone could do at least what little travel and exploration I've had the opportunites to do.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
                  And get yourself a bulb syringe for the air puff. It's tempting to use your mouth or a can of air duster but both of those solutions cause rust. Walgreens sells bulb syringes, and some hobby stores have them.
                  Be careful using the hole in your face to suck or blow on the reeds. These old organs have been around for a long time and may have accumulated dust from who knows where. The advice to carefully clean the reeds after blowing is sound but only contains the latter half of care. If using you mouth, which I have done often, :embarrassed: clean the reed thoroughly so you do not accidentally inhale 100-year old dust or whatever. This statement may sound far fetched but rather be safe than sorry.

                  Thanks for sharing your experiences. We would love to hear some more.

                  Nico
                  "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request... B-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wait. What steel reeds were we talking about? Reed organs 99.99% have brass reeds. I know of a rare example of a German instrument having one special solo rank with steel reeds. You will probably not encounter one in several lifetimes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      (Following this thread is an amazing journey into the many trails the reed organ brain blazes!)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All my reed organs have steel reeds. (They aren't pump organs... >duck<)

                        I've worked on quite a few squeezeboxes. It hadn't occurred to me that the bigger models would be that much different :embarrassed:. In any case, it's my opinion that a bulb syringe, a turkey baster, or even a shop vac is the way to go. All metals oxidise, and breath speeds this along. Compressed air generally isn't all that great either.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nutmegct View Post
                          (Following this thread is an amazing journey into the many trails the reed organ brain blazes!)
                          Tom,

                          Just wait until we get to the dead end<--->then see where it goes!!!O:-)

                          Michael
                          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Someone painted "April Fool" in big black letters on a Dead End sign. Eight miles straight up downtown somewhere.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                              Tom,

                              Just wait until we get to the dead end<--->then see where it goes!!!O:-)

                              Michael
                              To me a "dead end" is the stub of an organ reed where the tongue has broken off... :'(. 'Cause that spells a whole lot of searching, begging, stealing or whatever to find the right one to replace it.... But other dead ends do come up now and then...;-)

                              Nico
                              "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request... B-)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X