Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

First Look, Mason & Hamlin style 2369 sn 225155 (~1904?)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    First Look, Mason & Hamlin style 2369 sn 225155 (~1904?)

    Safe in my shop, almost everything seems to work, but the exhaust valves on the exhauster bellows are curled and leaky. Here are some pics:
    Attached Files
    Tom in Tulsa

    Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

    #2
    It appears to have had some work/patches at some point. The knee boards and music desk are missing.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by tpappano; 01-04-2020, 02:34 PM.
    Tom in Tulsa

    Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

    Comment


      #3
      YAY! Another one rescued. No kidding about the repairs, though. Roofing nails and staple gun–all one needs to effect a repair on a pump organ!

      For the font on the face of the stops, most computers use True Type Fonts (aka TTF), and if you don't have the Diploma font on your computer, you can always add it from the control panel (for a PC). On a Mac, either you can add it through the Font Book, or directly into the font folder. Casey (SubBase) will be your best resource on the names for the stops. Alternately, you can look up your particular model on the Reed Organ Database to find the names of the stops.

      For the paper to use, I wouldn't use most of the white papers available today because they're too bright (bright white paper). Ivory paper is a bit too shaded, so you might be able to visit a printing company to see if they have something in-between for the stop faces.

      Congratulations on your acquisition, and I look forward to reading of your progress on the organ!

      Michael
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks Michael!
        I found this exact model near the top of the ROS list, the stops look like they are supposed to be Sub Bass Coupler, Diapason, Viola Dolce, Viola, Vox Humana, Clarionet, Seraphone, Voix Celeste, Melodia and Treble Coupler, not sure about the exact order. They show an actual image from the catalog describing this model.
        I'm thinking the first things to fix are the curled-up leaking valve (leathers?) right on the front of the exhausters. This basic repair should make it more playable, and make it easier to troubleshoot the other parts. One thing I notice is that the actual action, keys, reeds, stop pulls, etc. seem to be a complete sub-assembly that looks like it can be lifted up and out of the case. I see where some screws are missing that appear to anchor the action to the top of the bellows section. If this is true it should be easy to inspect and clean up 8) I guess my first question is what material should be used for the exhauster valves? I'm guessing there is another pair of valves sandwiched between the exhausters and the main reservoir bellows?
        Thanks to All!

        edit: I'm also amazed at how in-tune it is with itself, not A440, but really sounds good!
        Tom in Tulsa

        Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

        Comment


          #5
          Tom, congratulations on choosing the best one of the two. It certainly will ask you for some TLC which I am sure will not be refused. The staples on the reservoir frame are interesting - certainly not original. The reservoir seems serviceable - for the moment but some time it will ask for some new bellows cloth - without the staples.... Fix those feeder valves and enjoy the sounds of this beauty.
          As far as stop faces go. Casey will be the authority on this. Michael has given good advice. Here is what I have attempted with some success on stop faces: Type the face name on the chosen paper with the appropriate font (see Michaels's advice). Cut out the circles as perfectly as possible - a punch might work better as you want smooth edges. The circles must fit perfectly in the recess of the stop face. If you have a metal lathe, prepare a mandrel with the exact dimensions of inside recess of the stop face, including the depth. Line the mandrel recess with a very thin layer of bees wax. Place the circle with the stop face inside the mandrel. Mix a portion of clear resin with its activator and pour carefully over the stop face circle in the mandrel. Let it set and remove carefully. You now have a perfectly sized and shaped stop face set in resin - should last longer than the plain paper ones. OK you puritans I know it is not authentic but its a nice project anyway....

          Enjoy the new toy Tom!
          Nico

          PS. I am attaching a picture of my M&H below.
          Attached Files
          "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

          Comment


          • tpappano
            tpappano commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks, Nico! Great idea for the stop faces, I don’t have a lathe but I have a friend who does who would probably be happy to make a mandrel 8) Great looking organ you have there!

          #6
          Tom,

          Check these threads, and you should find much great information there:I hope these links help!

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

          Comment


            #7
            Wow, great information!! I broke the organ down to its main subassemblies this evening, here are a few pics of what I found thus far. The primary air leak is from one of the front boards from apparent water damage. The board is partially de-laminated and bulging around the ports making a seal with the lifter valve impossible. The associated middle valve does not seal all that well either. The other front board seems in good shape and its middle valve seals well. The reservoir bellows, even though a kind of ugly repair, is pretty airtight. Both lifter bellows have a couple tiny holes where some creases are. I’m getting the sense that I can’t fit a new front board without destroying its lifter bellows, and that maybe the whole bellows system should just be rebuilt (?) The foundation board appears to be ok but the reed pan has a couple cracks, some of which had “repairs” done to them by filling with glue and duct tape!
            Attached Files
            Last edited by tpappano; 01-06-2020, 09:43 PM.
            Tom in Tulsa

            Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

            Comment


              #8
              Hmmm, looks like the old gal must have been exposed to excessive moisture at some point. If I were you I'd fix the valves first as you can get to them from the outside. Use new leather strips so that you can be sure it seals well. In that way you will probably be able to get some good sounds out of the belly of the beast - until you can get to redoing the reservoir and feeders as well. The "cracks" on the reed pan are actually expansion joints to allow for movement between the panels. They should not be glued but sealed over by strips of bellows cloth.
              Fun project!
              Nico
              "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

              Comment


                #9
                I’ll try some new leather for the valves, perhaps if it is nice and supple it might seal against the warped/bulging front board well enough. I’m also going to order some “hot” glue and I think I need new material for the gasket between the reed pan and foundation board. Is that supposed to be leather, fabric, or what 8) I been searching around for various materials, is there a particular thickness the bellows cloth should be for these instruments? Oh, and another question, while it’s all apart should the pallets be cleaned in some way to be sure they seal well?
                Thanks, Tom
                Tom in Tulsa

                Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

                Comment


                  #10
                  Yes, the seal between the reed pan and wind chest is of utmost importance! I have used soft suade-type leather about 3mm thick. Cut it in 1" strips and punch or burn the screw holes (if you choose to burn it - it honks like heck!). Some organs had blotting paper seals which is a one-time use item. Do not reassemble without replacing that seal with leather. I tried that against advise otherwise to my regret so I know what I am about with this one!
                  It is always a good idea to check, clean and re-seat the pallet valves. If you need new seals, use thin suade leather. Also check the pallet springs. Sometimes they corrode and weaken where they bend. I have found on one old organ some springs that were peed on by rodents and so weakened that they broke off when I tried to remove them. Fortunately they are not difficult to make. Make sure they seat properly on the pallets, either in a groove or small hole, depending on the design.
                  For bellows cloth use proper rubberized linen cloth. If you search on this Forum you will find discussions on that as well. Because I live on another planet I got mine from the Netherlands and had to pay a premium but it is the right stuff.
                  Good job so far Tom!
                  Nico
                  "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Forgot a tip about glueing new leather seals on the pallets - if you get there: Do not glue the leather strip entirely to the pallet, rather run a small strip of glue along the centerline of the pallet so that the edges of the leather strips can kind of flap loose.It makes it easier to get off later when the time comes to replace. I used wood glue for that purpose.
                    Nico
                    "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

                    Comment


                      #12
                      A quick update, I temporarily placed some 1/8" thick "closed cell polyethylene" foam for the front board valves, and now the bellows system is much tighter and will hold suction for several seconds, so I remounted it in the case for now. The reed pan system leaks a *lot* so over the next few days I will disassemble it and try to clean and seal it. Thanks all!
                      Tom in Tulsa

                      Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X