Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maclolm Love and Co - Waterloo NY (New Project)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Maclolm Love and Co - Waterloo NY (New Project)

    Having completed my Adler last fall pretty much, and not expecting to be able to convince the house ways and means committee that any further dabbling in the ways of reed organ restoration was possible, you can all imagine my elation at seeing an offer for a FREE Malcolm and Love/Waterloo reed organ that was being offered to a good home by a friend of mine from Dayton OH (he actually played tuba in the brass quintet that played at my wedding in 1993).

    In any event, I received said instrument Saturday. The only caveat was - it's in parts --- the upper action was in the process of being restored somewhat (needs new felts on the stops for certain). And so the keys, pallet rods, and other assorted items are all in a box /bags. So far I haven't come across any data relevant notes on the unit, but I'm trying to keep it on the DL for now. LOL. It's a beautiful black walnut cabinet though -- !'ll add some photos in additional comments to this thread. It is interesting that it has an "A.H. Hammond & Co." Octave Coupler Patent label, with the date of June 7, 1887. There's also a tag with "Action made by...", "Action finished by ..." and the like included.

    Unlike my Adler which used wooden connection pieces to connect the various internal rods, this one uses leather tabs, actually for this purpose. Also, it was restored (label noted) in 1980 so it's not that out of date I suppose. In any event, I doubt I'll be able to actually keep this one (unless, of course, it plays/operates significantly better than the Adler I restored last year - in which case it is likely that I'll need to sell the White Adler instrument.

    There is a stop knob that needs repaired, and some of the felts that line the stop rod holes are binding up on the rods causing an issue with rod movement.

    Otherwise, as the unit is reassembled and I take stock of the present condition, I'll keep everyone posted. Cheers...!

  • #2

    Comment


    • #3
      Worthwhile find John. Congratulations! You are right, that cabinet alone makes one kind of want to caress it. Just look how nicely it fits into the back of the bus... I am sure others, like myself will look forward to seeing some pictures of the keyboard and stops.
      Thanks for sharing.

      Nico
      "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

      Comment


      • #4
        The tricky part of this restoration will be trying to figure out how it all goes back together, since the fine gentleman who took it apart had every intention of putting it back together again, but didn't. There appears to be one pallet valve that is either missing/dislodged, etc., because without even any rods or keys assembled, one reed speaks when the pedals are operated. My first effort will be to lift the remaining upper action off the lower, and remedy any valve issues. Depending on the condition, I may re-leather things. But i'm more concerned actually with the wood panels at the very top that make up the music stand portion.

        I find it odd that the Malcolm Love and Co. organs don't seem to be very prolific these days. There aren't very many registered in the ROS database.

        john

        Comment


        • myorgan
          myorgan commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by John Edelmann
          I find it odd that the Malcolm Love and Co. organs don't seem to be very prolific these days. There aren't very many registered in the ROS database.
          Agreed, John! In over 3 decades, this is the first organ of that type I've ever heard of. In fact, when I saw it listed, I wondered it it wasn't another maker's organ, but re-branded with a dealer's name on it.

          I look forward to seeing photos of your progress.

          Michael

      • #5
        So .. the good news is that upon running a few diagnostics (?), I've determined the following:

        1) as noted in the pic attached here, the unit was restored in 1980 by Rev. Hilbert E. Pici
        2) The top board of the bellows /lower action was replaced at that time, plus all pallet valves appear to have been re-leathered and felted. There was only one valve that had gotten cocked slightly off kilter so was 'always on'. That was properly repositioned.
        3) The most obvious problem appears to be one stop knob that the felt had gotten bunched up in the hole, creating a braking action - i replaced that with some wool felt - that stop also had a loose knob, doubtless owing to the force used to try and move it while the felt was jammed. That has been re-attached as well.
        Other than that, I'm basically going to try and put it back together and see how it behaves. Once i put the pallet rods back in, and the keys, i'll check the individual reeds to see if any need attention.

        The only other identifying indication is a stamped number to the left of the repair /maintenance label, that shows "8093". Does anyone know of where a serial number might usually be on one of these Malcolm guys?

        john

        Comment


        • #6
          Update of photos
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #7
            So QUESTION...to all who have reassembled the rods onto the keyboard frame, how do you manage to get the holes lined up? On my Adler organ the lower hole was tight enough that the rods were perfectly positioned. on this one there's a tremendous amount of wiggle room.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #8
              So thru trial and error, i managed to get the rods and the upper guide lined up. Of course the keys are all out of whack from a level point of view due to the fact that they were leveled with little tape spacers of some sort that are largely now mis aligned with where they were originally. Still have one cyper playing without the key being depressed so i'll need to return to the valve area to remedy that. The individual who initiated this repair effort didn't have the benefit of our fine forum here, in advance. The keys themselves were labeled .. except instead of simply a straight numeric sequence, the 72 keys are labeled as "C1, C2, D1, D2, etc." which is fine except I missed the fact that he decided that the first "C" should be C2 instead of C1.

              It made lining things up a bit haphazard until I figured it all out. Before re-assembling the keys, I did clean the whites with steel wool and some 3000 grit head light buff pads.

              Meanwhile, I did test positive for the dread Covid issue this past tuesday, so I've been using the repair effort as a means to keep active while driving thru some flu symptoms.

              Comment


              • myorgan
                myorgan commented
                Editing a comment
                John,

                Don'tcha love the numbering systems of some organs? I thought I saw it on your organ, but there is generally a witness mark scribed in pencil across the backs of the keysticks. It is drawn as a diagonal so when the keys are installed, the line forms a straight, diagonal line, thereby confirming the keys are all in the correct place.

                So sorry to hear of your positive test. We'll be praying for you. Hopefully, you won't need to be hospitalized.

                Michael

              • Organfella
                Organfella commented
                Editing a comment
                John, sorry to hear about your testing positive. Sincerely pray that you will not get ill. Many people test positive and do not show any symptoms - I hope and pray that you are one of them!

              • John Edelmann
                John Edelmann commented
                Editing a comment
                No hospitalization but I have been having flu symptoms for longer than I've ever had in my entire life (and i'm only 58). This is definitely getting old. I'm up to some 60+ cough/fever/tylenol tablets since 10/5...

            • #9
              Alrighty! As of today, (having spent the majority of the Columbus Day Holiday working in the barn reconstructing and cleaning out individual reeds), the organ is back to playing only the reeds that ought to be being played and none when they ought not. So .. no cyphers or missing notes. The stop action leaves a lot to be desired. Having only seen two reed organ stop action designs, I can truly say that the one on my Adler was *way* more effective than the leather tabs used on this unit. I'm guessing though, that a circa 1880 instrument didn't have the benefit of more thoughtful designs.

              There were probably 15 or so reeds that needed cleaning - but otherwise, all reeds appear to be in very fine condition. I would not be inclined to use the ultrasonic cleaner on this unit at this time honestly (as I did on the adler). Nearly all of the reeds have a patent date of Oct 19, 1880 on them as can be seen in the photos.

              Basically, the only major anomaly that is bothering me is the stop for the treble coupler. It honestly looks as though there's no way it could have ever functioned given the angle of attack the rod exhibits in relation to associated stop rod.

              At this point, though, I believe i'm ready to submit it to the ROS database for registration. The keyboard is F to F with 73 keys. In truth, i'm not a fan of the upper octave however, and can easily see why most organ makers eschewed such obvious "excess". (I jest - but only sort of).

              I do love the overall design, though in terms of the way the rear panel has a top and a lower half that swings accordingly for ease of access.

              Finally, the bellows appear to be needing some work. While the unit does play, it takes a lot of pedaling to keep it stable (if that's possible at all). I'll delve into that over the next few days most likely.

              Comment

              Working...
              X